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Friday, May 23, 2003

Software Engineering Acronyms

PS - Problem Statement
SPMP - Software Project Management Plan
RAD - Requirements Analysis Document
SDD - System Design Document
ODD - Object Design Document

Wednesday, April 23, 2003

NZ ELECTRONIC TRANSACTIONS ACT 2002

Upcoming legislation

http://www.med.govt.nz/irdev/elcom/transactions/regulations/discussion/index.html

Purpose— Reduce Uncertainty & Equivalence of Paper and Electronic Means

The purpose of this Act is to facilitate the use of electronic technology by—

(a) Reducing uncertainty regarding—

(i) the legal effect of information that is in electronic form or that is communicated by electronic means; and

(ii)the time and place of dispatch and receipt of electronic communications; and

(b) Providing that certain paper-based legal requirements may be met by using electronic technology that is functionally equivalent to those legal requirements.

Contentious Items

11.Time of receipt—

An electronic communication is taken to be received,—

(a) in the case of an addressee who has designated an information system for the purpose of receiving electronic communications, at the time the electronic communication enters that information system; or

(b) in any other case, at the time the electronic communication comes to the attention of the addressee.

References

Journal of Information, Law and Technology
University of Queensland - Study Guides

10 KPIs for a country (Key Performance Indicators)

Income
Saudi Arabia: High. 9/10
New Zealand: Low. 1/10

Food: Can you get Weetabix or Weetaflakes?
Saudi Arabia: intermittantly, but if you stock up: yes! 9/10
New Zealand: No, but a local product is fairly similar. 3/10

Food: Are the hot cross buns nice?
Saudi Arabia: What hot cross buns? Oh yes, they are illegal. 0/10
New Zealand: Yumm. 10/10

Food: What about the bacon and sausages?
Saudi Arabia: Well the bacon in Bahrain is sourced from the EC and is delicious, though you can't take it over the causeway. 5/10
New Zealand: Bacon is a disappointment, though some of the sausages are nice. 6/10

Chores: How long does it take to clean the oven?
Saudi Arabia: Don't know because either the oven is new or someone else gets paid to do it. 10/10
New Zealand: About 45 minutes blood sweat and tears (and Mr Muscle Oven cleaner). 1/10

Driving: Are the roads dangerous?
Saudi Arabia: Very, but you can afford to drive a car built like a tank. 4/10
New Zealand: Somewhat. The roads are full of "speed-freaks" - there are more spoilers and alloy wheels than sheep, and you can only affford to drive a rust-bucket, which will collapse in an accident. 6/10

Weather: Is the weather nice?
Saudi Arabia: November-March is delightful, when there is no shamal or greasy rain of course. Otherwise not really. 5/10
New Zealand: By 11.30 the mist has cleared, and the clouds start to gather at around 3.30pm. The 4 middle hours are delightful. 4/10

TV: Is there a wide variety of TV
Saudi Arabia: 20-90 channels. Mostly rubbish though. 9/10
New Zealand: 5 channels. 5/10

TV: Can you watch the Sound of Music?
Saudi Arabia: No - but is this a blessing? 1/10
New Zealand: Yes. Very good fun. 10/10

Pollution: Is it polluted badly?
Saudi Arabia: Yes. 1/10. Used to be 2/10 before radioactive waste from war appeared. As it doesn't rain the poison just stays in the ground.
New Zealand: No. Although we have 2 suspected SARS cases and I have a mouse in the kitchen. 9/10

Atmosphere: Is the atmosphere harmful?
Saudi Arabia: Pollution prevents sunburn, but humidity creates bad pores and skin. 5/10
New Zealand: No ozone above New Zealand causes skin cancer, humidity perfect. 5/10


So Saudi Arabia scores 58% and New Zealand scores 59%.

Video Production

This week I have been working on a video:

Follow these 3 links ...

2003-04-15 Script of the communication video

2003-04-16 Video: Introduction to the New Zealand Team for ARENA Project

2003-04-16 Video: Introduction to the New Zealand Team for ARENA Project (out-takes)

OASIS BP

OASIS Forms Web Services Business Process Execution Language TC
(WSBPEL).

A new WSBPEL TC is being formed at OASIS to continue work on the
business process language published in the "Business Process Execution
Language for Web Services (BPEL4WS)" v1.0 specification. The TC will
focus on specifying the common concepts for a business process
execution language supporting multiple usage patterns, including
both the process interface descriptions required for business
protocols and executable process models.

http://xml.coverpages.org/ni2003-04-16-a.html

Article on "Editing Digicam Movies in iMovie"

If you have purchased a reasonable quality digital camera in the last few years you will have probably discovered you can shoot movie files in addition to taking still photos. Despite most cameras only recording movies of very limited duration, it's often possible to capture very effective movies. Using my Sony digicam I find it best to record at the highest size and resolution quality available, in my case this 320x240 pixels in so-called high quality mode. At this setting my camera can record 15 seconds at a time, with each movie file occupying about 5MB. Most digital cameras record these movies using the MPEG1 standard, producing a so-called "muxed" file, where the audio and video are combined together into a single track. However some record in other formats, such as AVI. More on this below....

http://www.nzmac.com/features/2003/04_06/rodney_tamblyn.php

War Driving

http://www.nodedb.com/newzealand/si/dunedin/?

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/technology/2197252.stm

http://www.pasadena.net/vacation/

Courses

UK MSc

Exeter - Autonomous Systems
Birkbeck - Advanced Information Systems

NZ Companies: Fonterra

Fonterra Co-operative Group Ltd: New Zealand's Multinational Dairy Company
Fonterra is a leading multinational dairy company, co-operatively owned by 13,000 New Zealand supplier shareholders. Exporting 95 percent of our shareholders' production, Fonterra is the world's largest exporter of dairy products, responsible for a third of international dairy trade across open borders.

Fonterra's global supply chain stretches from our shareholders' farms in New Zealand to customers and consumers in 140 countries. Collecting more than 13 billion litres of milk a year, we manufacture and market over 1.8 million tonnes of product annually, making us the world's leader in large scale milk procurement, processing and management, with some of the world's best known dairy brands.

Fonterra Website

Definition of Ineffable

1-Incapable of being expressed; indescribable or unutterable.
2-Not to be uttered; taboo: the ineffable name of God.

Dunedin DOT-NET Research Group

From ComputerWorld

Anthony Doesburg, Auckland
What's probably the southern-most Microsoft .Net outpost in the world has been established in Dunedin, where users of the development platform have met for the first time.

Chris Auld (pictured), of e-business specialist E-media, says about two dozen people showed up for the inaugural .Net user group meeting on April 10. A handful were commercial developers, one was a part-time developer and polytech lecturer, some were post-graduate university students and others were their teachers.

Auld says there was interest in the fate of projects undertaken by early adopters of the platform.

"I gave them a developer's overview, explaining how .Net differs from other platforms they were familiar with."

E-media has real-life .Net experience to impart, Auld says, having used the development framework to integrate its Marketeer e-commerce platform with MYOB accounting software.

"We think it's a good bit of kit and we're a reasonably conservative shop," Auld says, although "a Microsoft shop from a while back".

.Net does away with the integration difficulties that were common among web developers from the mid-90s on, says Auld. Typically they would improvise using HTML and XML, only for "things to come to grief trying to get stuff into and out of firewalls".

".Net is designed to bring together applications scattered all over the internet."

Auld says the user group will have an academic bias, in line with the fact that most attendees at the inaugural meeting were from non-commercial environments.

One of those there, Andrew Sewell, is from both. His day job is information systems development lecturer at Otago Polytechnic and after hours he does software development.

Sewell says he's in the process of converting the course he teaches from Visual Basic 6 to .Net, in response to student demand. That means 30 to 50 Bachelor of Information Technology graduates a year will be emerging with .Net skills.

"Many students are looking forward to me teaching it," Sewell says.

Part of their interest can be put down to a poster which appeared in the school of information technology, apparently at Microsoft's instigation. It states that .Net developers are in demand worldwide and urges students to enquire about .Net courses at their institution.

Sewell says the course he teaches is less about the platform and more about object-oriented programming. His experience of .Net is that it doesn't require the same workarounds to function in a truly object-oriented fashion that Visual Basic 6 forces on users.

Sewell, who says he has a client-server development job on his plate at present for which .Net looks appropriate, hopes to rub shoulders with more experienced .Net developers at the user group.

E-media's Auld, a self-confessed portable gadget freek, says the release in a week of Visual Studio .Net 2003 promises to make the platform more useful for developers of embedded applications. It's greater support for embedded code means applications for devices like the Pocket PC will be able to be written more economically.

"The run-time carries a whole lot of functionality that you'd otherwise have to write."

Link to original article

WEBLOG Start - Just after Easter 2003